nvctrl.exe

January 26th, 2006 - 05:24 pm ET by

Also known by the name Generic Downloader.aa, this Trojan can download viruses to your computer, execute remote files and redirect your search and home pages in Internet Explorer. To be deleted as soon as possible.

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  • windns.exe (W32/Forbot-EP) This process corresponds to the W32/Forbot-EP worm that created a service called Windows Domain Name Drivers on Windows NT family computers (NT, 2000, XP, 2003). Among other things, it starts denial of service attacks.
  • PDSCHED.exe (SDBOT.CN) Uses a fault that was discovered in 2003 with the Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Distributed Component Object Model (DCOM). Microsoft security bulletin MS03-026. Theft of 35 games CD keys.
  • nvctrl.exe (Trojan.W32.Zlob) Also known by the name Generic Downloader.aa, this Trojan can download viruses to your computer, execute remote files and redirect your search and home pages in Internet Explorer. To be deleted as soon as possible.
  • mssearchnet.exe (Trojan.Zlob.D Trojan) Also goes by the name of Generic Downloader.aa, this Trojan can download viruses to your computer. It should be removed as soon as possible.
  • MiniCap.exe (MiniCap) This is a small program that allows you to take photos of windows on your desktop. It places an icon in your taskbar. It can be associated with the “Print Screen” key on your keyboard once configured.
See the other processes from this designer

Field descriptions :

  • Short name : this is the name of the process which appears in Windows Task Manager.
  • Full name : this is the full name of the process as defined by its designer.
  • File path : indicates the location where the process program is located. You should be aware that this information may be different if you have changed the default installation location of a program.
  • Description : this will present information about the origins of the processes, its use and additional information.
  • Designer : provides the name of the process designer, with this generally being a hardware or software maker.
  • Associated Service(s) : indicates the services associated to the process in question.
  • System Processes : these correspond only to the processes which are owned by Windows, ensuring the operating system functions correctly.
  • Applicative Processes : concerns all non-system processes, which means those that correspond to programs.
  • Priority : concerns the default priority of a process, with there being 6 options: Real time, high, above normal, normal, below normal and low. The higher the priority is set, the more often the process will be executed over the other processes. You should be aware that changing this setting can lead to abnormal functioning of the PC.
  • Background Processes : concerns the "invisibles" processes which correspond to those which are running in the systems background and which are not used by the user. These can be, for example, a service.
  • Network Processes : concerns the processes which are directly linked to network management.
  • Hardware Processes : concerns the processes which are directly linked to hardware management.
  • Spyware : indicates whether the process in question is linked to a spyware program.
  • Trojan Horse : indicates whether the process in question is linked to the presence of a Trojan horse.
  • Virus : indicates whether the process in question is linked to the presence of a virus which has contaminated your system.
  • How to stop it : there are three ways to stop a process: close the program or stop the service which is behind the process, or stop it brutally through Windows Task Manager.
  • How to delete it : essentially concerns applicative processes. Deleting a process often requires that you uninstall the software being the process.